Canadian Dividend All-Star List

The Canadian Dividend All-Star List is comprised of Canadian companies that have increased their dividend for 5 or more calendar years in a row. I used the dividend record date to determine the length of streaks. Each month I update the excel spreadsheet which can be downloaded below.

Download the Canadian Dividend All-Star List here:

I’ve also included a Google Docs list of all the companies in the list with their streak length, but the excel spreadsheets provided above have a lot more information like the dividend yield, average highest yield for 3, 5 and 10 years, the past 10 years worth of dividends, and lots of other stock information.

Canadian Dividend All-Star List

Prior to starting this blog I did some research on how to make a blog and what I took away as the most important piece in creating a successful blog was to provide valuable content to your readers. Now you may be thinking, well obviously! And while this may seem obvious, it can be hard to put into practice on a regular basis. One way I plan to provide valuable content to my readers is by creating the Canadian Dividend All-Star List and updating it monthly.

I read a lot of different finance blogs on a regular basis, and it took me awhile to figure out how I was going to differentiate myself. After a month or so, I came up with the idea to provide the Canadian Dividend All-Star List. When I screen US dividend paying companies I use David Fish’s US Dividend Champions excel file. The file contains over 10 years of dividend history for companies that have raised their dividend for more than 5, 10 and 25 years in a row as well as regular stock information (share price, P/E, EPS, P/B, etc). This file is incredibly useful, especially when starting to screen for stocks. [David Fish’s US Dividend Champions List can be downloaded here.] Until February 2013 there was no Canadian equivalent. Enter the Canadian Dividend All-Star List. The Canadian Dividend All-Star List is comprised of Canadian companies that have increased their dividend for 5 or more calendar years in a row. I used the dividend record date to determine the length of streaks.

With limited spare time it took me about a month to compile all the data. There is no quick or easy way to get the annual dividend history for more than a decade for what started with 43 companies. Now that I have this information it should be less time consuming to update the file. I plan on updating the file on a monthly basis. A new version should come out at the beginning of each month.

It is my hope that you find the Canadian Dividend All-Star List useful and it helps you with your dividend growth strategy. While I certainly don’t expect donations, I do appreciate them. To create and update this file takes a lot time and effort, so donations are always welcome. You can use the donate button below or the Donation page.


Now for a few disclaimers, the first of which will be accuracy of the information. While I have tried my best to provide accurate information, I am subject to human error. Finding the dividend history to four decimal places can be difficult when looking at older payments and considering splits and rounding. The file contains a mix of information pulled from Yahoo! Finance and data I entered manually. Data entered by myself has come primarily from the company’s investor relations website, or their annual reports. The annual reports were taken from the company website or www.sedar.com. In the few instances where I was unable to find the dividend history from the company website or the annual report, I used TMX, Yahoo! Finance, or Google Finance and compared the information. Some of the stock information is pulled directly from Yahoo! Finance, and while I am assuming it to be correct, I have not confirmed this. As you can see I have tried my hardest to provide accurate information, but I cannot guarantee the accuracy of the information.

Now for the second disclaimer: The intended use of the Canadian Dividend All-Star List. I am happy to share this information to as many individual investors as possible for free, but this list is not intended to be used for commercial use, unless you have received written permission by me.

If you have any suggestions on how to improve the Canadian Dividend All-Star List, please don’t hesitate to contact me or leave a comment on this page.

52 comments to Canadian Dividend All-Star List

  • terry chard

    very good thanks for the work

  • Dale

    Hi Michael, this a great site and I really appreciate all the work that you have put into it!

    Thanks,

    Dale

  • Guy Lachapelle

    Thanks for providing this list, I am just getting familiar with Dividend based investing. At the moment I am just educating myself. Could you provide a description of all the columns? (e.g. +/- % vs Graham, TTM P/E, etc..)

  • Mat

    This is great…i have been wanting such a list for some time now, but never had the time to compile it. Thanks so much for taking the time to develop this!

  • Matt

    Thanks for your effort in this. Do you accept donations in Bitcoin?

  • Michael,
    Thanks a lot for the list. It seems that Canada is one of very few countries with good dividend traditions and your list is very valuable for investors. I hope it become as popular as David Fish’s list.
    SDS

    • Thanks for the comment. If my list gets close to as popular as David Fish’s I’ll be very happy. His list is a bit more detailed than mine at this point, but it’s always good to have something to strive for.

  • Michael,
    If you still in Australia and have time it seems worth to make their All-Star List. There are several good dividend payers.

    • Yeah I’m still in Australia, but I’ll be heading over to South-East Asia shortly. I should be back in Canada in August. When I first arrived in Australia I started looking at Australia companies. You can take a look at the Pan Pacific list: http://www.standardandpoors.com/indices/sp-pan-asia-dividend-aristocrats/en/au/?indexId=spsdivpaarusdw—p-rpa—. They cover companies that have increased dividend for 7 or more consecutive years in the S&P Pan Asia Broad Market Index (BMI). I couldn’t find a list that catered to Australia only companies, but a few Australia companies are covered in the Pan Pacific list.

      I’m basically living out of a van while I travel around, so it’s hard to find decent Internet time. I don’t think I’ll have time to do an Australian list and maintain it.

  • R. Albert

    This list/blog is really useful and I truly appreciate the effort to collect the info as it takes inordinate amount of time and your generosity to share it with others.

    May you prosper more than ever!

    Thank you very much!

  • jw.

    This is fantastic: this sort of analysis is exactly what I’ve been looking at doing myself. Thank you and great work.
    (One side note: special dividends cause a massive skew on the payout ratios. Not sure if this is something worth excluding or separating from your analysis.)

    Thanks again for this. Once I get my portfolio out of the disaster it’s currently in, I’ll be sure to drop you a donation.

    PS – If you’d like any VBA coding to help pull in the data from Y!, fire me a message.

    • Glad to here you like the site. I might have to take you up on the VBA coding help. Right now I just use someone else’s template that I downloaded to get the information from Yahoo Finance. I didn’t actually do any VBA coding myself, because I don’t know how. I’m pretty good with excel, but I have no experience with Visual Basic. It’d be nice to get a bit more automated information out of Yahoo Finance.

      The Canadian Dividend All-Star List basically ignores all special dividends, so the payout ratios you see in the excel file only use regular dividends. I’ve considered adding in some more columns or another row for special dividends, but this is likely a long ways off. Getting the accurate dividend history for multiple companies takes quite a long time, so it will probably be awhile before the list shows special dividends.

      Cheers,

      DGI&R

  • CK1985

    Thank you for sharing these sheets. This will save a ton of time researching DRIPs

  • Dude, thanks for this list. So much great info on US dividend stocks, but little on CDN ones. I have been looking for this list for a while now.

    That you have it in spreadsheet form is amazing. Thanks for your efforts

  • Jeremy

    Excellent list! Very well researched and thoroughly detailed. Keep up the amazing work!!! I really appreciate your efforts.

  • Peter

    Michael, your blog — which I recently discovered — fills a void that I didn’t expect would get filled, except perhaps, eventually, on a commercial basis. It’s especially nice seeing the small cap stocks, several of which are favorites of mine. Big thanks.

  • JIM

    i have a book on investing by graham .. the intelligent investor
    but i am unsure as to how to interpert the graham number you have assigned to each stock , and i do not know how to calculate this number any help would be appreciated
    jim

  • This is a great resource! Any chance you could include share buyback information?

  • Zack A.

    Great work. Thanks. In your opinion, how important is the debt ratio?

  • Tom & Patricia

    Just discovered your web site. It looks like a labor of love. Nice job. I have been watching Parkland Fuel lately. Unless I missed it I did not see them on your list. I took a position with BMO several months ago and am very happy with the results.

  • Found your site as a link from Dave Fish`s Div. Champions site. Thank you for putting this together. I`ve been having difficulty finding Canadian stocks and this gives me a Great starting point.

  • karly

    Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. LOVE that you’re sharing your great spreadsheets and strategies. Thank you!

  • Leslie

    I looked at your JAN 01 2014 spreadsheet, ran my eye down the yield column and noticed MKP, with a yield of 8.62% and a streak, according to the streak column, of 10 years. I then found MKP’s website and this page in particular: http://mcanmortgage.com/investor-relations/dividends. According to MKP, it paid interest dividends totalling $1.80 in 2011, $1.36 in 2012 and $1.15 in 2013. It also paid a capital gain dividend of $0.05 in 2012.

    I must be misunderstanding something about your spreadsheet.

    Can you please explain why you give the company a streak of 10 years?

    • The company pays out a regular dividend and then once a year they have an special dividend that is usually recorded on top of the regular dividend. The special dividend fluctuates from year to year which is why the totals fluctuate. My list ignores the special dividends. I used old annual reports on sedar.com to determine the streak. The website doesn’t have the entire dividend history shown.

  • Dividend newbie

    Fantastic work – keep it up. Really appreciate this

  • Neil Cawley

    Thank you for this stellar effort! I, like everyone else have a tough time finding good information on our Canadian stocks. I use VectorVest for most of my “starting” research and I create a folder in there where I place your list, Then I can use some of their search criteria and apply it to your list. Dividend investing really rocks, and dividends that grow are the “piece de resistance”
    Your hard work is greatly appreciated!

  • ryszard21

    DGI&R (Michael?),
    I’ve just discovered your incredible site! The amount of time and effort you’ve devoted to creating this masterpiece is simply astounding! It’s exactly the data-rich Canadian resource, amplified by your investing experience and expertise, for which I’ve been searching for months — a virtual gold mine! I can’t thank you enough for your magnanimity and generosity of spirit. As the song goes, “I wish I had a million dollars…” (smile)
    Richard

  • Helen_in_Toronto

    Hello! I just discovered your site and I must say that it’s great! Two quesions;
    1. THE LIST- is it best to just refer and download the latest list? Is is comprehensive of all the all-star companies, i.e.; a “master list”?
    2. What is a good rule I can follow when buying div. paying stocks? Example; BCE just declared a div. increase. So, from a timing perspective, when should I buy the stock? Anytime after the last quarter but before the end of the current quarter, so I can get the dividend payment for the current quarter?
    Thank you.

  • Neil Cawley

    Thank you for all your hard work, May I add that I believe IPL (Inter Pipeline) deserves a spot on the list also. I have checked with the “Canada Stock Channel” at http://www.canadastockchannel.com/profile/?symbol=ipl and it seems to fit the requirements. It has increased the div for at least 5 years. Granted it was set up as a trust until last year when it changed to a corporation, but still has increased the div regularly.
    ,,, Neil

  • Neil Cawley

    That “other” list is a welcome addition. Thank you for thinking of it. There are some pretty fine companies here too and maybe some of them will graduate to the all star list. At least I hope that they will as I own a couple of them!
    … Neil (Here in the Great White North)

    • I agree. I really wanted to have information available about the Canadian banks, as I feel most Canadian dividend growth investors have these companies in their portfolio.

  • Hi, I feel bad I wasn’t aware of your blog. It is a fantastic resource for Canadian investors!! I will certainly get the word out!

    Keep the great work. You are providing a valuable resource here…

    Cheers
    DN

  • Peter

    Thank you for your excellent efforts. This is truly a requirement for all of us who are DIY investors who wish to be more active than Warren B’s ‘buy an index fund’ type.

    The Canadian angle is specifically what I have been looking for. I have a few correspondents I will advise of your site.

    Peter in Guelph

  • Hi DGI&R,

    Thank you for sharing your holding, I have many of your holding in my portfolio. Great job! Let the money work for us.

  • T K

    The most recent copy asks for a linked file (MW CDN DIV CHAMPS (Yahoo & FinViz).xls]Yahoo’) when I open it in Excel. Ignoring the message leads to bad data in the file. Can you fix?

  • Neil Cawley

    I have no problem opening it with excel 2007. I can then save it to a folder of my choice.

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